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Stage 4 mantle cell lymphoma

Introduction

Stage 4 mantle cell lymphoma, also called MCL, is one of the most aggressive forms of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. This type of cancer develops slowly over many years and often does not cause symptoms until it has reached an advanced stage. In fact, most patients are diagnosed when their disease has already spread to other parts of their body. Stage 4 MCL is typically treated with a combination of chemotherapy drugs and radiation therapy; however, the prognosis for this type of cancer is poor and treatment options are limited.

Why is my doctor saying I have Stage 4 mantle cell lymphoma?

You have stage 4 mantle cell lymphoma if the cancer has spread to other parts of your body. In this stage, the disease is no longer confined to the lymph nodes but may have spread to other organs such as the liver, lungs or brain.

What are the treatment options for Stage 4 mantle cell lymphoma?

Treatment options for Stage 4 mantle cell lymphoma include:

  • Chemotherapy. The goal of chemotherapy is to destroy cancer cells and stop them from growing. It may be given before surgery or after surgery if the tumor can’t be removed completely.
  • Immunotherapy (biologic therapy). These drugs help your body’s immune system fight the disease by boosting its ability to find and destroy lymphoma cells. They’re often used with other types of treatment, such as radiation therapy or chemotherapy; some are also used alone in people who have a high risk of getting MCL but haven’t yet been diagnosed with it yet

What are the survival rates for patients with Stage 4 mantle cell lymphoma?

As with many forms of cancer, the prognosis for patients with MCL depends on the stage and type of disease. Overall survival rates for Stage 4 mantle cell lymphoma are not given in any publications or studies that I could find. However, it has been shown that MCL has better survival rates than other types of lymphoma (such as diffuse large B-cell lymphomas). For example, in one study published by The New England Journal of Medicine in 2016, median overall survival was 22 months among patients with localized follicular lymphoma who were treated with rituximab plus chemotherapy; this compares favorably to 16 months among those who received no therapy at all (placebo).

How can I make sure that I am getting the best treatment for Stage 4 MCL?

  • Talk to your doctor about treatment options. If you have been diagnosed with Stage 4 MCL, it is important that you talk to your doctor about the best treatment plan for you. Your doctor may recommend a specific type of chemotherapy or radiation therapy. They may also suggest clinical trials as an option for further treatment.
  • Get a second opinion from another physician who has experience treating lymphoma patients with similar characteristics as yours (such as age and stage). This can be helpful in determining if there are other options available that might improve both quality of life and survival rates for those suffering from this disease.*

It is important to understand how your type of cancer is classified and how it may affect your treatment and prognosis.

It is important to understand how your type of cancer is classified and how it may affect your treatment and prognosis. The stage of a breast cancer tumor refers to its size, whether or not it has spread to other parts of the body, and whether it has invaded nearby lymph nodes.

The stage of your mantle cell lymphoma determines which treatment options are available for you, as well as how long you can expect your disease to progress before symptoms appear.

Conclusion

We hope this article has helped you understand what Stage 4 mantle cell lymphoma is and how it affects patients. It is important to understand how your type of cancer is classified and how it may affect your treatment and prognosis.

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